DEEP Thought

What is the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything?!

(All posts are personal reflections of the blog-post author and do not necessarily reflect the views of other DEEP members).

LATEST ARTICLE

HONEYEATERS: CALLS, NECTAR AND POLLINATION

By Vishesh Leon Diengdoh, 14th December at 11:30 am

YellowWattlebirdWhen I had camped nearby Port Arthur in the Tasman Peninsula, this November, I was woken up at five in the morning by eight or nine Yellow Wattlebirds who kept calling in a sequence and repeating this for at least half an hour. From within my tent, I counted eight, based on the loudness and direction of the call, the ninth call was too far to make out. The same thing happened like clockwork the next morning as well.

 

 


EARLIER ARTICLES

WOULD MOVING A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME SMELL AS SWEET?

By Shane Morris, 20th November at 4:30 pm 

Arrival-poster-9As I watched “Arrival”, a movie about aliens descending to Earth and their interaction with a human linguist, I got thinking about the science behind the movie. This wasn’t the physics of space travel or the anatomy of the visitors but the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis*, the principle that language shapes a speaker’s world view or cognition. In this article I connect these thoughts to my research on conservation translocations and proposing a new name for a scientific technique.

 


ENERGY FOR THOUGHT: FOOD SECURITY CAN BE OBTAINED THROUGH AN INCREASE IN ENERGY SUPPLY 

By Elise Ringwaldt, 6th November at 2:30 pm

Red Apple isolated with clipping pathIn 2017, I was invited to visit The Breakthrough Institute and attend their Dialogue: Democracy in the Anthropocene. In reflection, I describe in this article how there are concerns for the growing human population food requirements, especially for developing nations. One way we can improve the food wasted right now, is through growth in the energy sector, which can improve technology throughout the food supply chain – saving food and corresponding resources.

 


WHAT OPTIONS DO WE HAVE TO MITIGATE ‘DANGEROUS’ IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE?

By Sanghyun Hong, 5th October at 11.00AM

EnergyAlthough it is a little bit late, we are doing something to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, aren’t we? We are installing on-shore and off-shore wind farms, large-scale and rooftop solar photovoltaics (i.e., solar panels), solar thermal power plants, and even expensive batteries. Wait, something is not correct. Why do we emit more greenhouse-gas emissions when we build more renewables? The answer is simple.

 


THE FORGOTTEN TASMANIAN EMUS 

by Tristan Derham, 10th September at 10:27 AM

tasemuIf you are from Tasmania you have likely heard your mate’s story about the time they, or their friend’s friend, saw a thylacine. Hiking alone, they saw a big dog on the track – but wait! Those stripes! That tail! And just as they reached for their camera… the animal had slipped away into the deep bush. Clearly the thylacine lives on in the public imagination so strongly that we see it in our waking dreams. How sad, then, that we do not hear stories of wild emus in the Tasmanian bush.

 


THE BIG DEAD BIRDS OF AUSTRALIA

by Matt Fielding, 6th August at 10:44 AM

bIG BIRDWhen we think of fossils, we typically think of dinosaurs and giant mammals. However, Australia was also home to more than 90 known extinct bird species. Understanding the processes that led to the extinctions of these ancient birds improves our understanding of extinction in general and can inform conservation decisions to reduce future loss of our wonderful avian fauna, keeping our bird buddies around to sing for future generations.


THE TRUE STORY OF FLIGHTLESS BIRDS – INTERROGATIONS ABOUT THE EVOLUTION OF FLIGHTLESS BIRDS

by Lucile Lévêque, 31st May at 12:06 PM

The popular ideas we have about the way birds became flightless can seem straightforward, but the actual evolutionary pathway is rather complex. The stories about how evolution crafted biodiversity are fascinating, but they are long stories punctuated by exceptions and oddities. This article will concentrate on flightlessness in groups other than the giant prehistoric birds and the ratites, as the evolutionary reasons for their flightlessness are different stories.


CITIES AND HEALTH: FOR BETTER OR WORSE

by Emily Flies, 27th April at 3:52 PM

Historically, cities were considered centres for filth, disease, violence and amoral behaviour. Even today, urbanization has been linked to disease emergence and some diseases are more prevalent or spread faster in cities. However, many public health professionals argue that the city dwellers of today experience health benefits from improved access to healthcare, economic opportunities and vibrant social settings. So who’s right and what’s really happening with health in cities?


AUSTRALIA HAS A BAD MAMMAL EXTINCTION RECORD – AND IT’S PROBABLY WORSE THAN WE THINK!

by Matt McDowell, 27th March at 8:34 AM

When a species is lost from a community the processes and functions they performed are also lost. Since European settlement in 1788, Australia has had the highest mammal extinction rate in the world. The ongoing recognition of new taxa suggests the extent of Australia’s biodiversity loss is underestimated


 

A PEEK INTO THE LEGAL AND POLITICAL ASPECTS OF PROTECTING INDIGENOUS ‘INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY’

by Hanh Nguyen, 27th February at 10:32 AM

The ongoing fight against biopiracy and the appropriation of indigenous traditional knowledge and resources.


“KNOW WHERE YOU STAND”, THE CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE FOR BIODIVERSITY AND HERITAGE (CABAH) MASTERCLASS ‘INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN A FIELD SETTING: WORKING ON COUNTRY’

by Tessa Smith, 29th January at 11:46 AM

Learning the history and aiming higher for beneficial collaborations with indigenous groups. Two researchers from the DEEP group reflect on the five day CABAH Masterclass ‘Indigenous community engagement in a field setting: Working on Country‘ hosted by Monash University and the Taungurung Clans in Melbourne.


ROBUST SCIENCE, THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE, AND WESTERN AUSTRALIAN PETROGLYPHS

by Carley Fuller, 20th December at 10:05 AM

Increasingly at odds with this concept of Aboriginal stewardship, industrial development on the peninsula has intensified over the past decades. CSIRO monitored petroglyphs at seven sites between 2004 to 2014 using colour and reflectance spectroscopy, choosing five southern sites close to industrial production and two northern sites, further from industry. This year the overall ambiguous results seemed to have given a green light to further industrial development.